hyperlocal

I’m going to use my website more to serve as a brain dump for my PhD musings on ‘composing in a hyperlocal environment’.

I’ve entered my second year of research and I’m currently thinking about the first year of fieldwork that has taken place. My project for-Wards is the main body of work, where 10 Brummie composers work in 10 Birmingham constituencies to co-create new music inspired by the locality. You can learn more here.

I will examine how a composer can create music that is ‘hyperlocal’ – a journalistic term relating to work that is specific to the matters concerning a small community or geographical area, through practice-led research.

I will examine the following sub-questions:

– How does a composer develop co-compositional methods via an examination and inclusion of socially engaged art methodologies to create hyperlocal art music?
– How does a composer of hyperlocal art music formulate suitable evaluation criteria to assess the efficacy of works of art created in this context?

cracking on

March time. Spring is here!

I have literally 2 months to compose 4 pieces of music that make up the Selly Oak District Commission.

I reckon I’ll be able to do it! I’m clearer about two pieces I need to write.
I have nearly completed the Bournville ward piece, I had lots of amazing instruction from my collaborators over at P-Cafe (crunch writer’s group).

My supervisor Michael Wolters gave me great advice, which is to not get caught up in thinking too hard about the end result but enjoying the process. What I love about collaborating with others is that it’s difficult to get dead-locked as you keep returning to one another and help each other out of an impasse.

Carillon

As part of the for-Wards Selly Oak district commission I am collaborating with creative writers in Bournville ward to compose a short piece for carillon.

I’ve never written music for bells/organ before so a new and exciting challenge (well crotales once). We had a fab workshop with Trevor Workman end of Jan.Here he is performing “Adagio in G minor” by Tomaso Albinoni. The percussive sounds were unexpected but the group and I quite like them!